Munday (#462)

As in, one mundane Monday: Charlie woke up to the sound of some New Age-tinged nature music, got dressed, pulled on his backpack, and went out to wait for the bus. After Friday‘s bumpy start, his teacher had planned to have him breakfast at school (with the hope of having this occur at home eventually), and Charlie’s Monday unrolled pleasantly from there. Following a good school day and poking around the kitchen with Grandma and Veronica offering him snacks he said “no” to, Charlie appeared in the doorway across from where I was sitting:
Storehappy
“Puzzle piece.”

And brought in his favorite pirate puzzle to do before we headed off on some very unexciting errands: CVS, for a new black make-up pencil to use to help Charlie learn to use all of his fingers while playing piano, and then the grocery store.

I was in search of different breakfast foods for Charlie—he has eaten, or turned his nose up at, many cereals, breads, and other breakfast items over the years and we are making another go at cold cereal with non-dairy milk under his teacher’s kindly auspices—having seen Charlie safely settled before the sushi section, to contemplate his choice. A man in a navy blue jacket was standing, hands on waist, in front of the middle section of the cereal aisle and it took me another moment to catch sight of a smaller, solider, man in t-shirt and shorts sitting cross-legged on the ground, arranging boxes of cereal. The standing man said something and moved off and then the younger man with Down’s Syndrome and I noticed each other.

“Hi,” I said.

“Hhhi,” he said, holding cereal boxes.

I took out a box of Panda Puffs and one of Gorilla Munch. Charlie, sushi chosen, was run-pacing a circuit from the sushi section to the front door, laughing. “Panda Puffs with peanut butter or Gorilla Munch without?” I asked.

“Peanuh budder,” said Charlie, and paced off.

I asked him to carry the shopping basket and he slowed down to a walk, our precious food items (including some cookies for my Monday-weary Elementary Latin class) in his hands.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

  • What’s all this about?

%d bloggers like this: