Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff


Charlie walks on, in sweatshirt and gloves  
Tuesday we did two
long walks for a total of nine miles, I know, what a shocker, after the past few days' mileage (Saturday, 4 walks and a mega-bike-ride; Monday, 3 walks and a slightly less mega-bike-ride). 

We actually could have done three walks, with one before school. The only problem was, it was already 8.30am when Charlie came down the stairs to get into the white car.

He'd awoken at 3.30 am. I had gotten the timer and set it for an hour and a half while Charlie got dressed. I went back to bed while he paced in his room and hummed (in a cheery way). I must have been dozing in and out because I don't remember when I couldn't hear any more footsteps or Charlie's voice. I got up and found him under his blanket, sound asleep. It wasn't 5am yet so I turned off the timer and went back to sleep.

Jim and I got up at the usual times but Charlie was still soundly slumbering. He didn't get up, as noted above, till a bit late. As he had gotten up early enough the past few days for an early (as in early while the dawn rises) walk, I suspected he'd request one Tuesday morning before getting in the car for school—but then he would be really late (as would I for work; Jim had had to get his office earlier himself and had taken the train). 

So yesterday Charlie stood on the front lawn and kept saying 'I want, I want' and letting his eyes slide right, down the sidewalk where we walk. 

I did a great deal of hemming and hawing on the porch, avoiding eye contact, 'ummmmm-ing' and the like. In these situations, any words that are anything but 'let's walk' seem to agitate Charlie. 

After about a minute of my stalling (yes, that's what it was), Charlie got into the car and off we went.

As for the early pre-dawn wake-ups, I think (think) that it could be because of a need to answer the call of nature, so to speak. Certainly Charlie getting up to do so and then (with some parental and timer-guidance) going back to bed and back to sleep is a big improvement over he (and me) having to contend with a soggy bed and blanket combo in the early pre-school morning rush (or at 3.30am). And while we're on the 'call of nature' subject—because I really prefer not to talk about this at all regarding Charlie, he didn't ask me too and what preteen (or any child, or any one) wants Mom blogging about this kind of stuff?. So, quickly, anyways, I've noted several times that some of Charlie's biggest difficult moments/neurological storms seem to be connected to major stomach distress (which is not unheard of in many a child on the spectrum, certainly from anecdotal reports). Since Charlie's been on a daily regiment of walkwalkwalkridewalk, he's had much less stomach trouble; apparently exercise can speed 'things' up.

And maybe I aim low, but everything in the previous paragraph—indeed, in this whole post—is not only very fine with me, but all steps of moving ahead, in a metaphorical sense.

So you can be sure, we'll be staying on the move in a quite literal way, too.

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Comments
2 Responses to “Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff”
  1. emma says:

    3.30am is around the same time Dimitri used to wake up, it does seem like it could well be due to a call of nature (I have the same trouble myself I might add). And once awake, difficult to get back to sleep.
    It’s something of a major step for Charlie to be able to resettle by himself (Dimitri is still at the very early stages of this), with the help of the timer, he’s seems to be doing great.

  2. Erin says:

    It’s a beautiful thing when that moment of stalling works out, isn’t it?

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